ISSUE 5 Curatorial Episteme
Epistemic Encounters

The last decade has seen questions arise concerning the phenomenon of artistic research, and how it has played a meaningful role within educational environments, from art academies to exhibition spaces. To answer these questions in more detail, this essay will draw on four recent research projects to explore the perspectives both of institutions of higher learning and those currently engaged in exhibition-making.

Despite the obvious risks posed by the rhetoric of the “knowledge economy” and the way it thinks in terms of the “production of knowledge,” let us ask: How might artistic research with a topical focus on profound thought processes make a crucial contribution to our current epistemological reflections, and further more move beyond a simple parallelism of “the contemporary” and the horizontalist moment, “now”? Or simply put: What purpose does artistic research actually serve?

Today, art education is haunted again and again by two persistent misconceptions. First, the conception of art as an irreflective, spontaneous and intuitive practice is still prominent, not only outside the institutional walls of the academy, but also inside those walls. This has created a situation, in which various approaches, perceptions and temporalities have come to co-exist within the current academy – sometimes overlapping, sometimes completely a-synchronous and antagonistic. A single institution may contain, for example, both a modernist studio model for fine arts education and a deconstructionist course track that views art in terms of “after images.” Secondly, research is often imagined as a tool by which to offer some sort of discursive support for a not-yet-articulated practice.

From the above, it follows that for the sake of an utterly necessary institutional emancipation, research should reposition itself as a fundamental and equal component of artistic practice. It should exist as a component of art, manifesting itself in artists’ reflections on how to devise questions, trajectories, and concepts that may give rise to their work. 

How does such a proposition answer the relentless institutional question of providing “deliverables,” a question posed to us by ubiquitous neo-liberal, commodification-oriented thinking?

Deliverables are sets of pre-determined, modularized, measurable, controllable outcomes. The very concept is related to the instrumental logic of our efficient, result-driven culture and its neoliberal focus on free market mechanisms. Such thinking supports a flat worldview that, as Byung-Chul Han described in Fatigue Society, continuously demands transparency and visibility – and therefore, forms of exhibition. It thus produces a horizontalist world that, with its Twitter-democracy and the ubiquitous blogosphere, brings a “net culture” into being that leaves no room for rest, contemplation, creation or experiment. Such a world is carried away entirely by entrepreneurial thinking and a focus on the contemporary moment, in which adaptivity and flexibility are elevated as supreme values. In short, it is a world without room for verticalist perspectives (like reflexivity), new modes of imagination, or historic profundity—perspectives which are characteristic of and fundamental to the academy.

Installation view Exhausted Academies: Fatigue Society, Byung-Chul Han, Seoul Media City, 2016. © Photo: Seoul Museum of Art

In line with these observations, the curatorial project Exhausted Academies1 asked how we might rethink the relationship between artistic research and the art academy, specifically through a critique of the “exhausting” achievement-oriented and instrumentalized tendencies of the contemporary neoliberal institution. The project further sought a return to a “verticalist” perspective that “makes space” for attention and concentration; for experiment, novel questions and speculation; for reflexivity and new modes of imagination; for an open-ended form of differential thinking that values not-knowing, the singular, the affective, the transgressive, and the unforeseen.

1 The research project Exhausted Academies was presented in Seoul Media City (2016) and Nottingham Contemporary (2017), with contributions from Tiong Ang, Inci Eviner, Rene Francisco, Byung-Chul Han & Isabella Gresser, Hito Steyerl, Ane Hjort Guttu, and Muntadas. www.artandeducation.net/announcements/143995/doing-deceleration

Research within art institutions, therefore, should specifically engage in the tasks of considering, revealing, and speculating. In other words, research should strongly urge investigations into novel verticalistic perspectives that may lead to knowledge of the “not-yet-known.”2 To pave the way, research must exist as an autonomous space for concentration and experiment, and in doing so it will open up a capacity to pose novel questions. And only by posing such questions will we be able to challenge the structure of neoliberal institutional thought.
But what does this kind of more performative, vertical approach to developing questions mean for the way in which research is ultimately delivered?

2 Cf. Irit Rogoff, Practicing Research/Singularising Knowledge, in Agonistic Academies (ed. Jan Cools and Henk Slager, Sint Lukas Press, Brussels 2011). www.e-flux.com/announcements/35514/book-launch-agonistic-academies/

Owing to the inseparable connection between the making of art and the act of thinking, research must somehow be present in the intermediate processes of interconnection and translation. This means that research must be conceived as an oscillating translation, in which the material and immaterial continuously merge into one another, and in which dialogical activity focuses on dynamic processes. Such a pursuit may be characterized as performative3, precisely because the emphasis is not on production of an end product or of its reception, but on actions taken out of a sense of urgency, which seek to challenge the status quo by creating alternative—or even speculative—propositions. The power of this lies in the fact that artistic processes are considered as if from within, and therefore are able to articulate an ultimate claim for a different perspective on reality.

3 In her article, Artistic Research: A Performative Paradigm? (PARSE Journal, 3, 2016, pp. 129-142) Barbara Bolt argues: “a performative research paradigm needs to be understood in terms of the performative force of the research, its capacity to effect “movement” in thought, word and deed in the individual and social sensorium. The movements enable a reconfiguration of conventions from within rather from outside of convention.” (129) https://parsejournal.com/issue/repetitions-and-reneges
How should the institutional environment for this form of research be shaped? Or in other words: where should such research take place?

Given the numerous theoretical perspectives one may draw from, the study of the discursive dimension of an individual’s creative process—in many curricula referred to as “artistic research”—should preferably be offered in “seminars.” These seminars however should not focus on simply repeating canonized knowledge—as is characteristic of academic institutions with fixed curricula and clearly separated disciplines, which have degenerated into mere teaching machines—but instead, as in my Roland Barthes-inspired curatorial project To Seminar4, they should address the creation of an experimental laboratory by way of the de-institutionalization of the educational matrix. And they may thus create a non-disciplinary, affective environment, in which students may potentially become artists.

Installation view To Seminar (Sarah Pierce, Falke Pisano, Tiong Ang), BAK Utrecht, 2017.

4 Cf. the curatorial project To Seminar that I curated in 2017 at BAK, Basis voor Actuele Kunst, Utrecht. This project unfolds as a contemporary reading of philosopher Roland Barthes’ essay “To the Seminar” (1974). Engaging with the notion of the seminar – as a concept and as an intimate and complex practice – as something pivotal for learning today, To Seminar transforms the word “seminar” from a noun into a verb in an attempt to activate its “unpredictable rhythm,” proposing it as a tool for intervention into the settled practices of education today, both in art and beyond. For what was once celebrated as the “educational turn” today turns far too often into either routine initiation into a knowledge economy or cognitive capitalism, or into the placatory emptying of the meanings of “knowledge production,” “community,” and “method.” If, like the era of Barthes’ writing, ours is a present immersed in “a certain apocalypse in culture,” the true task of learning is not to normalize this present’s morbid symptoms as has become customary, but rather to collectively think through and act out alternative imaginaries. With artists, theorists, and other cultural practitioners, To Seminar reengaged the three conceptual spaces that intersect when a seminar takes place – institution, transference, and text – and sought to recompose them into a balanced comradeship for renegotiating the conditions of the contemporary. www.artandeducation.net/announcements/142277/to-seminar

Up to the present, the academy has been the pre-eminent institutional environment for “doing research”5. Since its foundation, it has defined itself by inter-esse, or intellectual curiosity, and excluded oikos, or calculating reason. Now, despite the threat of increasing instrumentalization, quantification and disciplinary division, and despite the hollow rhetoric of the creative industry and its cognitive capitalism—which manifests itself in homogenizing patterns of thought, such as expert knowledge, knowledge transfer, stakeholders, employability, assessment and quality assurance, which try to reduce art education to a neoliberal dispositive—the academy still seems to be the last enduring free space in the cultural field for giving rise to innovative and experimental processes of production, reflection and presentation. The academy should continue to fight for this kind of temporary, autonomous space for experiment and reflection. Such a space could thrive through the combination of various forms of knowledge into new speculative ensembles.

5 The curatorial project (workshop, symposium, publication—curated by Jan Kaila and Henk Slager) Doing Research—in which research within and outside of institutional settings was expounded—took place as part of dOCUMENTA 13, 2012. www.artandeducation.net/announcements/109237/doing-research

Thus, an educational environment could emerge that no longer exclusively focuses on the repetition of canonized knowledge, fixed curricula and clearly separated disciplines, but also addresses the creation of experimental seminar environments, which may be characterized by forms of open-ended, non-hierarchical, and speculative thought.6 Such environments could generate—in spite of the current technologies of distraction—a space for differing intelligences and unconventional sensibilities, which enables students as future artists to imagine anew the world and how we relate to it.

Does this mean that our understanding of “theoretical practice” continues to be colored by a strong philosophical and conceptual framework?

6 In the curatorial project Whatever Speculation (2019), the question of the position and situation of the concept of “Speculation” is again raised. www.mahkuscript.com/4/volume/3/issue/1
A screening related to this project took place at OnCurating in Zurich: https://oncurating-space.org/re-imagining-futures

The first decade of the 21st century was characterized by a disproportionate interest in the production of knowledge. Consequently, many artists started to view the act of artistic creation as process-oriented and rigidly determined by a series of points of departure or deliberation, which seemed to steer the making of art. Increasing academization—which is to say, the willingness to comply with those formatting requirements imposed on the production of knowledge by the institutional apparatus—appears to underline this tendency. For this reason, it now seems more urgent than ever to return our attention to what precedes knowledge production, i.e. the process of thinking, a thinking that has been a bond between philosophy and art since time immemorial.7 Precisely in this dialogue with philosophy, artistic thinking may return its attention to not-knowing, the singular, the affective, the transgressive, and the unforeseen.

What are the consequences of such demarcative epistemic shifts?
In line with Hannah Arendt’s book The Life of the Mind, we must restore a clear distinction between thought and knowledge. Arendt refers to Kant’s sharp division of thought processes, which are categorized as Verstand and Vernunft. Verstand is the domain of cognition and empirical knowledge, while Vernunft (Reason) goes beyond that domain to engage in a continuous search for Understanding. Arendt views both philosophy and art as pure activities of thinking, where thinking is always self-aware of the activity of thought.

7 Such an approach is the starting point of my book The Pleasure of Research (Hatje Cantz, Berlin 2015). This publication delves into issues such as knowledge production, artistic thinking, medium-specificity, and context-responsiveness. How do these issues connect to the current state of art education and artistic research? The Pleasure of Research argues that artistic research should foreshadow a “gaya scienza,” a temporary autonomous activity where intellectual pleasure and an experimental method invigorate forms of research and thought. www.e-flux.com/announcements/29650/hatje-cantz-publication-the-pleasure-of-research

Moreover, Arendt explicitly presented her act of thinking in a public space as a performative act to demonstrate it as a form of engagement. And thus, as Hito Steyerl argues8, this form of thinking is primarily situated in the tradition of emancipatory struggles, which Peter Weiss described as an Aesthetics of Resistance—a form of thinking that demands room for public debate vis-à-vis institutional disciplines and standardization and the formulation of topical values and truths. Where necessary, it may even dare to make judgments that run counter to the regulatory registers of cognitive capitalism and symbolic labor.

What do such epistemic and performative shifts mean for a contemporary understanding of research?

At stake here is a radical manner of resistance based on the intrinsic potential of art to imagine the world differently—a speculative and associative form of open-ended thinking that looks towards the unknown, and thus withdraws from deterministic and causally inspired models of thought. In short, it is a form of thinking that cannot be caught in static, pre-formed categories and that will ultimately contribute to what Foucault described as a “new aesthetics of existence.” Subsequently, research should be understood as a verb and certainly not as a noun (i.e. a deliverable to be presented as a final product). The point of emphasis here is that artistic research should not be ossified within an institutional architecture of distinctly defined inquiries, but should rather remain linked to the dynamic concerns and urgencies put forth by artists.

Artistic research—owing to its provisional qualities—may therefore best be described as a transpositional framework, a non-disciplined space in which collections of creative practices, artistic thinking processes and curatorial strategies continually produce new sets of relationships. These idiosyncratic combinations in turn contribute to the articulation of urgent, planetary issues.

8 Hito Steyerl, Aesthetics of Resistance, MaHKUzine 8, Winter 2010, Utrecht, pp. 31-37. https://issuu.com/hku-online/docs/mahkuzine08_web

Moreover, artistic research as a field of inquiry—as presented in the 3rd Research Pavilion (Venice Biennale, 2019 entitled Research Ecologies9—outlines at the same time its own methodological and epistemological preconditions. Artistic research may be characterized by uninterrupted, transversal interaction and the articulation of three inseparable and intrinsically interconnected lines: the line of creative practice, the line of artistic thinking, and the line of curatorial strategy.

Installation view Research Ecologies (3rd Research Pavilion, Venice Biennale, 2019) © Photo: Haupt & Binder

In the curatorial project Farewell to Research (9th Bucharest Biennale, 2021), these three lines will be further situated as departing from the perspective of the assemblage 10. This will offer a critical view on the rhetorical impact of an over-emphasis of any of these three lines—creativity, artistic thinking, or curatorial strategies—on our current understanding of the concept of research.

Thus, the proposed project furnishes a distinct impetus for the reclamation of creativity—a concept that, owing to its intrinsic quality of freedom, seems nowadays hostage to the one-dimensional rhetoric of the protocol-oriented creative industry, but in fact it should stand for exploring the potential of the sensible through the making of art.

A similar danger of reduction is present in the debate on knowledge production. Here, the process of artistic thinking is almost completely subjugated to the academic regulations and monolithic protocols of cognitive capitalism. The dynamics of artistic thinking, which by definition precedes disciplinary knowledge, does not however lead to transparent identities.
9 Instead of being focused on a curated exhibition, the 3rd Research Pavilion (convenors: Mika Elo and Henk Slager) showcased manifold practices of artistic research. The participating researchers – self-organized in six different “cells” – showcased their different modes of creative thinking in parallel processes of exhibiting, performing, exposing, discussing and articulating material encounters and related forms of critical reflection. With this focus, the 3rd Research Pavilion was fully in line with the current debate on the posthuman predicament, including the situation of the ecological disequilibrium, a relational approach to agency, the development of transdisciplinary or transversal discourses, and the exploration of novel practices of criticism and narratives in the form of neo-materialistic propositions.

These are approaches that —in line with Guattari’s agenda-setting Three Ecologies—ask again for ethico-political statements. After all, we suffer from a loss of common orientation or a common world. To think again about this world we desperately need another system of coordinates, another distribution of metaphors and sensitivities: new fictions and imaginaries to address the constituencies and configurations of the present and speculate about the future. Here are some significant challenges for artistic research: developing new theoretical and artistic representations of novel modes of interconnection between human and non-human actors and factors; articulating new modes of thinking and representing the global environmental crisis; and related to this last point, addressing issues of historical responsibility. www.researchpavilion.fi

These are urgent issues that must strategically be made public. Transformational spaces will need to be generated for them. Such is the perspective of the curatorial line, which stands for generating experimental spaces for public and performative modes of reflection and presentation, and for contextualizing connections between objects, images, discourses, locations, histories, and especially possible futures.

The specificity of artistic research—an activity that is entirely determined by vital encounters between creative practice, artistic thinking, and curatorial strategies—somehow remains (and this is exactly what the curatorial project Farewell to Research intends to explore further by means of a series of presentations and discussions) unequivocally embedded within art, while at the same time articulating questions, raising doubts, and most of all creating novel, future-oriented ideas.

10 In using such a characterization, the 9th Bucharest Biennale (Farewell to Research, 2020-2021, curator Henk Slager) sets itself at a clear distance from those misconceptions that have accumulated around the concept of artistic research over the past decade. These misconceptions seem to reduce research in the arts to a noun, whereas the above-described dynamics and related provisional qualities rather demand the dynamics of a verb. But above all, these misconceptions seem to result from the absolutization of one of the three—intrinsically and inseparably connected —lines. 

Although the main issue here obviously is imagining the world in a different way, which implies new future-orientated modes of political imagination, one should not equate the perspective of the curatorial line to political activism—just as one should not reduce the line of creativity to product innovation research, or the line of artistic thinking to pseudo-scientific research.

The potential of artistic research lies—as the project Farewell to Research emphasizes—in ‘thinking differently,’ i.e. a way of thinking that demonstrates how we may shift from planning to speculation. This is an associative form of open-ended thinking that alludes to the unknown and thus withdraws from deterministic and causality-inspired models of thought. Documentation in progress: www.mahkuscript.com/5/volume/4/issue/1

Notes
1 The research project Exhausted Academies was presented in Seoul Media City (2016) and Nottingham Contemporary (2017), with contributions from Tiong Ang, Inci Eviner, Rene Francisco, Byung-Chul Han & Isabella Gresser, Hito Steyerl, Ane Hjort Guttu, and Muntadas. www.artandeducation.net/announcements/143995/doing-deceleration
2 Cf. Irit Rogoff, Practicing Research/Singularising Knowledge, in Agonistic Academies (ed. Jan Cools and Henk Slager, Sint Lukas Press, Brussels 2011). www.e-flux.com/announcements/35514/book-launch-agonistic-academies
3 In her article, Artistic Research: A Performative Paradigm? (PARSE Journal, 3, 2016, pp. 129-142) Barbara Bolt argues: “a performative research paradigm needs to be understood in terms of the performative force of the research, its capacity to effect “movement” in thought, word and deed in the individual and social sensorium. The movements enable a reconfiguration of conventions from within rather from outside of convention.” (129) https://parsejournal.com/issue/repetitions-and-reneges
4 Cf. the curatorial project To Seminar that I curated in 2017 at BAK, Basis voor Actuele Kunst, Utrecht. This project unfolds as a contemporary reading of philosopher Roland Barthes’ essay “To the Seminar” (1974). Engaging with the notion of the seminar – as a concept and as an intimate and complex practice – as something pivotal for learning today, To Seminar transforms the word “seminar” from a noun into a verb in an attempt to activate its “unpredictable rhythm,” proposing it as a tool for intervention into the settled practices of education today, both in art and beyond. For what was once celebrated as the “educational turn” today turns far too often into either routine initiation into a knowledge economy or cognitive capitalism, or into the placatory emptying of the meanings of “knowledge production,” “community,” and “method.” If, like the era of Barthes’ writing, ours is a present immersed in “a certain apocalypse in culture,” the true task of learning is not to normalize this present’s morbid symptoms as has become customary, but rather to collectively think through and act out alternative imaginaries. With artists, theorists, and other cultural practitioners, To Seminar reengaged the three conceptual spaces that intersect when a seminar takes place – institution, transference, and text – and sought to recompose them into a balanced comradeship for renegotiating the conditions of the contemporary. www.artandeducation.net/announcements/142277/to-seminar
5 The curatorial project (workshop, symposium, publication – curated by Jan Kaila and Henk Slager) Doing Research – in which research within and outside of institutional settings was expounded – took place as part of dOCUMENTA 13, 2012. www.artandeducation.net/announcements/109237/doing-research
6 In the curatorial project Whatever Speculation (2019), the question of the position and situation of the concept of “Speculation” is again raised. www.mahkuscript.com/4/volume/3/issue/1/ A screening related to this project took place at OnCurating in Zurich: https://oncurating-space.org/re-imagining-futures/
7 Such an approach is the starting point of my book The Pleasure of Research (Hatje Cantz, Berlin 2015). This publication delves into issues such as knowledge production, artistic thinking, medium-specificity, and context-responsiveness. How do these issues connect to the current state of art education and artistic research? The Pleasure of Research argues that artistic research should foreshadow a “gaya scienza,” a temporary autonomous activity where intellectual pleasure and an experimental method invigorate forms of research and thought. www.e-flux.com/announcements/29650/hatje-cantz-publication-the-pleasure-of-research
8 Hito Steyerl, Aesthetics of Resistance, MaHKUzine 8, Winter 2010, Utrecht, pp. 31-37. https://issuu.com/hku-online/docs/mahkuzine08_web
9 Instead of being focused on a curated exhibition, the 3rd Research Pavilion (convenors: Mika Elo and Henk Slager) showcased manifold practices of artistic research. The participating researchers – self-organized in six different “cells” – showcased their different modes of creative thinking in parallel processes of exhibiting, performing, exposing, discussing and articulating material encounters and related forms of critical reflection. With this focus, the 3rd Research Pavilion was fully in line with the current debate on the posthuman predicament, including the situation of the ecological disequilibrium, a relational approach to agency, the development of transdisciplinary or transversal discourses, and the exploration of novel practices of criticism and narratives in the form of neo-materialistic propositions.
These are approaches that – in line with Guattari’s agenda-setting Three Ecologies – ask again for ethico-political statements. After all, we suffer from a loss of common orientation or a common world. To think again about this world we desperately need another system of coordinates, another distribution of metaphors and sensitivities: new fictions and imaginaries to address the constituencies and configurations of the present and speculate about the future. Here are some significant challenges for artistic research: developing new theoretical and artistic representations of novel modes of interconnection between human and non-human actors and factors; articulating new modes of thinking and representing the global environmental crisis; and related to this last point, addressing issues of historical responsibility. www.researchpavilion.fi
10 In using such a characterization, the 9th Bucharest Biennale (Farewell to Research, 2020-2021, curator Henk Slager) sets itself at a clear distance from those misconceptions that have accumulated around the concept of artistic research over the past decade. These misconceptions seem to reduce research in the arts to a noun, whereas the above-described dynamics and related provisional qualities rather demand the dynamics of a verb. But above all, these misconceptions seem to result from the absolutization of one of the three – intrinsically and inseparably connected – lines.
Although the main issue here obviously is imagining the world in a different way, which implies new future-orientated modes of political imagination, one should not equate the perspective of the curatorial line to political activism – just as one should not reduce the line of creativity to product innovation research, or the line of artistic thinking to pseudo-scientific research.
The potential of artistic research lies – as the project Farewell to Research emphasizes – in ‘thinking differently,’ i.e. a way of thinking that demonstrates how we may shift from planning to speculation. This is an associative form of open-ended thinking that alludes to the unknown and thus withdraws from deterministic and causality-inspired models of thought. Documentation in progress: www.mahkuscript.com/5/volume/4/issue/1
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As Professor of Artistic Research (Finnish Academy of Fine Art 2010-2015) and as Dean of MaHKU Utrecht, Henk Slager has made significant contributions to the debate on the role of research in visual art. In 2006, he co-initiated the European Artistic Research Network (EARN), a network investigating the consequences of artistic research for current art education in symposia, expert meetings, and presentations. Departing from a similar focus on artistic research, he has also (co-) produced various curatorial projects, a.o. Translocalmotion (7th Shanghai Biennale 2008), As the Academy Turns (Collaborative project Manifesta, 2010), Doing Research (dOCUMENTA 13, 2012), Offside Effect (1st Tbilisi Triennial), Timely Meditations (5th Guangzhou Triennial, Asia Time, 2016), To Seminar (BAK, Utrecht 2017), Research Ecologies (3rd Research Pavilion), and Farewell to Research (9th Bucharest Biennale 2021). He recently published The Pleasure of Research (an overview of educational and curatorial research projects 2007-2014), Hatje Cantz, Berlin 2015.

Archive
Archive

Issue 5 Curatorial Episteme
Editorial / Curatorial Episteme Hongjohn Lin
Epistemic Encounters Henk Slager
The Curatorial Thing Hongjohn Lin
Ethics of Curating Meng-Shi Chen

Issue 4 Curatorial Consciousness in the Times of Post-Nationalism
Editorial /​ Curatorial Consciousness in the Times of Post-Nationalism Manray Hsu
When Kacalisian Culture Meets the Vertical City: Contemporary Art from Greater Sandimen Manray Hsu
Pathways and Challenges: Art History in the Context of Global Contemporary Art Jau-Lan Guo
Curating Commemoration: Conditions of Political Choreography, a Performance Exhibition in Retrospect Sophie Goltz

Issue 3 Curating Performativity
Editorial /​ Curating Performativity I-wen Chang
Choreographing Exhibitions: Performative Curatorgraphy in Taiwan I-wen Chang
Living and Working Together in the Now Normal: Visual Arts and Co. at Bangkok Art and Culture Centre Pawit Mahasarinand
The Curatorial as A Praxis of Disobedience Miya Yoshida

Issue 2 Curators' Living Rooms
Editorial /​ Curators' Living Rooms Sandy Hsiu-chih Lo
Extended Living Room: Space and Conversation ruangrupa(Ade Darmawan, Mirwan Andan)
Freeing the Weights of the Habitual Raqs Media Collective
Curating Topography Sandy Hsiu-chih Lo

Issue 1 Curatography
Editorial /​ One Step Forward, Two Steps Backward Hongjohn Lin
What is Curatography? Hongjohn Lin
Les fleurs américaines Yoann Gourmel, Elodie Royer​
There are No Blank Slates Eileen Legaspi Ramirez​
Issue 5 Curatorial Episteme

Issue 4 Curatorial Consciousness in the Times of Post-Nationalism

Issue 3 Curating Performativity

Issue 2 Curators' Living Rooms

Issue 1 Curatography